The Truth About ‘Lesbian Bed Death’: It’s Complicated

The Truth About ‘Lesbian Bed Death’: It’s Complicated

The first major study of its kind to compare gay male, lesbian, and heterosexual couples on basic issues such as sex, communication, and money in 1982, sociologists Pepper Schwartz and Philip Blumstein published American Couples: Money, Work, sex. Among a number of other findings, their research revealed that lesbian partners had less regular intercourse than other people. And so came to be the trope of “lesbian sleep death.” A lot of relative studies into the previous three decades have actually replicated these outcomes, although several have discovered no differences when considering lesbian and couples that are heterosexual.

Throughout the decades, however, those of us who first publicized the American partners findings have started to doubt them. More especially, we now have questioned whether “sexual regularity” is considered the most measure that is valuable of intimate wellness of the relationship, whether our views and definitions of intercourse might be inherently heterocentric, also phallocentric. […]